* All times are based on Canada/Eastern EDT.

  • 08:30

    Canada/Eastern

    8 parallel sessions
    08:30 - 09:45 EST
    200B

    IHE21-Inuit Self-Determination in Research through the Qanuippitaa? ...

    The Qanuippitaa? National Inuit Health Survey (QNIHS) is a trail blazing health survey covering the social determinants of Inuit health. Inuit lead, decide, and own every aspect of the QNIHS, with Inuit regions building on their resources and growing capacity to plan and implement the survey. Inuit priorities are addressed through extensive engagement and Inuit organizations will use the data to develop policies and programs that benefit us. Permanently funded on a five-year cycle, the QNIHS began the first round of data collection in January 2022 in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region and will continue in Nunatsiavut, Nunavik and Nunavut in 2022 and 2023. The QNIHS is more than just a survey. Since 2018, the QNIHS has made substantial and concrete contributions to Inuit self-determination in research. This session will explore advances in key areas where, for the first time, Inuit organizations are leading the way. The session co-chairs will introduce the QNIHS and explain how Inuit are building and directing. Co-Chairs: Naluturuk Rowan-Weetaluktuk, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami Mona Belleau, Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated Janine Lightfoot, Nunatsiavut Government Meghan Etter, Inuvialuit Regional Corporation

    08:30 - 09:45 EST
    206C

    MAR05-Atmosphere-sea ice-ocean interactions in a changing Arctic

    Global warming is amplified by a factor of three in the Arctic and is linked to a dramatic reduction in Arctic sea ice. As the manifestation of both thermodynamic and dynamic processes across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere system, sea ice is susceptible to changes in both the atmosphere and ocean that in turn modulate its extent, mobility and thickness. Changes to the ice pack have cascading effects on the entire marine system, such as altering biogeochemical processes, affecting the livelihoods of Inuit, and impacting the maritime industry. Hence it is critical to understand the processes that act across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere system and how they modulate ice pack characteristics at all spatial and temporal scales. This broad session covers the oceanographic and atmospheric processes that influence the sea ice cover, and the physical properties of the snow-covered sea ice itself. Studies based on local knowledge, in situ observations, remote sensing and/or modelling are invited. Co-Chairs: David Babb, University of Manitoba Stephen Howell, Environment and Climate Change Canada Kent Moore, University of Toronto Alexander Komarov, Environment and Climate Change Canada

    08:30 - 09:45 EST
    200A

    MAR08-Advances in optical monitoring of Arctic/sub-Arctic marine environments

    The Arctic is changing dramatically in response to global warming, highlighting the need for ongoing monitoring of the marine ecosystem. Optical measurements provide a cost-efficient, and often the only way to collect physical and biogeochemical data on the sea ice cover and water column across large spatial and temporal scales. Continual technological advances are leading to new applications in satellite and aerial remote sensing to study changes in surface properties. New submersible optical instruments attached to long-term mooring deployments and autonomous platforms are also providing new insights into the seasonal evolution and spatial variation of the marine ecosystem. We propose a session on optical measurements, simulations, and algorithm development to better understand light propagation and interactions in the Arctic Ocean. Studies based on remote sensing, in situ observations or modeling of radiative transfer and bio-optical relationships in sea ice and open water Arctic environments are invited. Co-Chairs: Lisa Matthes, Takuvik International Research Laboratory, Université Laval Jens Ehn, Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba

    08:30 - 09:45 EST
    201A

    MAR57-Changing Arctic: Science and Policy Studies

    This interdisciplinary session will present emerging scientific results on the rapidly changing Arctic and northern environment. The physical environment of the Arctic has changed dramatically over the past decades with the underlying causes of these changes, in terms of the cryosphere, oceanography, hydrology and meteorology, being addressed through various scientific approaches. The application of the scientific results in relation to policy issues will be considered, including those on the ecosystem, Indigenous peoples, and commercial activities. The importance of Arctic research and its consequences in looking ahead is very timely and pertinent to informing northern communities, the public and contributing to public policy issues in this strategically important part of Canada. Papers are sought from research, science and policy activities that are nearing completion, currently being undertaken, or those planned and just getting underway. Co-Chairs: Helen Joseph, HCJ Consulting David Fissel, ASL Environmental Sciences

    08:30 - 09:45 EST
    206A

    NPD04-Pathways to net zero and sustainable energy transformation...

    Across Canada, federal mandates - including a legislated economy-wide net zero goal by 2050 with interim targets - are calling for a transformative change in how energy is generated, distributed, and consumed. On a broad scale, carbon emissions caps and Net-Zero policies are some of the key tools that are being deployed to enact these transformations. Within Canada's north, these policies represent a myriad of challenges and opportunities that are unique to the region. This session will serve to highlight the north's energy transformation from a holistic viewpoint, in light of these challenges and opportunities, across a broad range of topics, including housing, transportation and electricity generation, distribution and utilization. This session's scope will address these challenges and opportunities from socio-cultural, political, technical, economic, and environmental perspectives, to better understand the role energy will play as a driver of change in the North. Co-Chairs: Michael Ross, Yukon University Joe Collier, Yukon University

    08:30 - 09:45 EST
    206B

    TER14-Permafrost Thaw and Its Consequences...

    Permafrost exists beneath about 15% of the exposed land surface area in the Northern Hemisphere. It is considered as the backbone of the Arctic; its long-term dynamics determine that of northern ecosystems, the stability of infrastructure, and the way of life of its inhabitants. In recent decades, permafrost temperatures have increased dramatically, triggering a chain of ecological, hydrological, geomorphological, and biogeochemical processes affected by thresholds and feedbacks, resulting in major engineering challenges in northern communities. Future permafrost thaw will have direct consequences on local communities, reshape landscapes, cause ecosystems restructuration, and affect the global climate system. This session, hosted by the NSERC strategic network PermafrostNet, invites presenters to address subjects pertaining to the characterization of permafrost, the monitoring and prediction of permafrost change, the hazards and impacts associated with permafrost thaw, and the adaptations to permafrost degradation. Co-Chairs: Samuel Gagnon, PermafrostNet Daniel Fortier, Université de Montréal Stephan Gruber, Carleton University Hannah Macdonell, Carleton University

    08:30 - 09:45 EST
    206D

    TER27-Freshwater ecosystems as sentinels and integrators of the arctic landscape

    Lakes and rivers are major components of Arctic landscapes, now strongly affected by climate change. Freshwaters are home to unique wildlife and provide important ecological services to Inuit communities, like potable water and food resources. Increasing temperatures and changes in precipitation regimes are causing shifts in biogeochemical cycling on the landscape, aquatic diversity, and productivity. Freshwater ecosystems quickly respond to these changes, potentially altering water quality and community composition, and expressed in the sediments offering long term environmental archives. These ecosystems can thus be considered as integrators and sentinels of climate change. The goal of this session is to present the state of research in freshwater ecosystems as integrators and first responders in a changing Arctic. We aim to host presentations exploring past and present states of freshwater ecosystems, and their different responses to climate change. We welcome contributors from all areas of Arctic limnology. Co-Chairs: Dani Nowosad, University of Guelph Paola Ayala-Borda, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi Isabelle Laurion, Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) Reinhard Pienitz, Université Laval

    08:30 - 09:45 EST
    200C

    TER41 - Breaking boundaries in Arctic Research: Sentinel North Field Schools

    In summer 2022, Sentinel North and its partners offered a field school on the overarching theme of "Nordicity and Advances in Natural Products Science". Taking place at the Centre for Northern Studies research station in Whapmagoostui-Kuujjuarapik (Nunavik), this PhD school offered early career researchers a unique opportunity to interact with high-level scientists and local experts in a state-of-the-art interdisciplinary training program bridging disciplines such as chemistry, plant biology and ecology, phytochemistry, and ecological economics. Beyond the interdisciplinary scientific program, this experiential training also included activities with local indigenous communities to promote cross-cultural exchanges where traditional knowledge and new technological advances can meet and benefit all. In this session, participants will be presenting the work they have done during the PhD school, discuss about lessons learned, and facilitate a a broader discussion about transdisciplinary training and research. Co-Chairs: Pascale Ropars, ArcticNet Marie-France Gévry, Sentinel North Normand Voyer, Université Laval Town Hall Session

    10:30

    Canada/Eastern

    10:30 - 10:45 EST
    Ballroom B

    Opening Remarks

    Opening remarks from Christine Barnard, Hilda Snowball, Philippe Archambault and Jackie Dawson.

    10:45

    Canada/Eastern

    10:45 - 12:00 EST
    Ballroom B

    Plenary - Ocean Decade Initiatives for a Changing Arctic

    This plenary will feature top speakers from across governments, academia, and the not-for-profit sector. Panelists will discuss Canada’s response to the “Ocean Decade” with a focus on the Canadian Arctic and North, including topics such as ocean health, biodiversity, conservation, ocean literacy, and Canada’s Ocean Decade champions. Speakers: Liisa Peramaki, Paul Snelgrove, Victoria Peck Moderator: Jackie Dawson

    12:00

    Canada/Eastern

    12:00 - 13:00 EST
    203A

    Amundsen Science Luncheon (Side Meeting) (Open)

    Every year, the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen helps hundreds of researchers, experts, and students to conduct their projects. During this lunch and learn session, students and members of Amundsen Science will present the benefits of using the vessel to study the Canadian Arctic and explain how access to the ship is more inclusive than ever. Presenters: Anissa Merzouk, Marine Research Coordinator, Amundsen Science Charlie Nakashuk, Environment and Climate Change Canada Carlissa Salant, Memorial University Alexandre Forest, Executive Director, Amundsen Science

    13:00

    Canada/Eastern

    13:00 - 13:30 EST
    201C

    Impacts of Investing in Inuit Self-determination in Northern Research

    The National Inuit Strategy on Research has made it clear the many reasons why it is important to support a leading role for Inuit in northern research. Here we showcase case studies showing the impact of what is possible when Inuit are provided with tools, capacity and support to lead research through a series of case studies using SIKU: The Indigenous Knowledge Social Network. 1. The SIKU+SmartICE Ice watch shows how Inuit have made over 1000 posts all across Inuit Nunangat communities about ice conditions that facilitate language preservation and the use of Inuktut classification systems to share knowledge about local hazards promoting safety, while at the same time crowd-sourcing sea ice climate change data at scale for the entire Canadian Arctic. 2. The 3rd annual Goose Watch shows how Inuit, Cree and Innu have collaborated to help share knowledge of geese arrival while systematically documenting the timing of migration, nesting and hatching, tracking Avian flu, migratory flyways and other details from Makkovik to Tuktoyaktuk and James Bay to Resolute Bay, an unprecedented showcase of collaborative Indigenous knowledge that provide quantitative data on a region and issue with historically little data. 3. The Qikiqtait Inuit-led Protected and Conserved Area project demonstrates how 150 Inuit worked together in Sanikiluaq to crowd-source the Inuit calendar of seasonal resources from berries to fish, local invertebrate fisheries to seals and reindeer facilitating local real-time management by the HTA and creating the most comprehensive resource inventory ever created for a protected area to date. We further elaborate on these case studies to show the Social Return on Investment of these programs, including the quantitative contribution to food-security in the pandemic (store-bought equivalent of food returned to the community as a part of programs) as well as the data per dollar return on investment relative to academic-driven research as well as a suite of typically intangible benefits including the carbon footprint of Arctic research. Overall, the approach shows that investing in Inuit and Indigenous communities for northern research is not only important and ethical, but has extensive holistic benefits for communities, research and presents a new paradigm for Indigenous communities and researchers working together at scale across the North. As the research paradigm shifts in Canada, more and more support is available for community driven projects for tools, training, capacity building, project management and financial support from AES/SIKU with partners like ArcticNet (through the North-by-North Program and other) and CIRNAC to implement similar approaches in their communities. Presenters: Lucassie Arragutainaq & Joel Heath

    13:30

    Canada/Eastern

    9 parallel sessions
    13:30 - 14:45 EST
    201A

    IHE23-Living dog-ether: dogs and humans together

    Dogs have been an integral part of the life of Inuit and First Nations for centuries. Human and dog health are interconnected, with dogs providing numerous physical and psychological benefits to humans. But the changing Arctic brings new challenges at the human-dog interface, including a changing human-dog relationship as well as issues around dog overpopulation, bites, fear and risk of zoonoses. Developing and implementing community appropriate strategies that promote the health of both dogs and people, and culturally respect past and evolving relationships with dogs, require innovative and multifaceted solutions. This session seeks to present recent initiatives with northern communities to address the challenges and opportunities at the dog-human interface. Representatives of local organizations, researchers, and NGOs will be welcomed to share their experiences and insights. A round table titled 'What Future for Dogs in Northern Communities?' is proposed after this session. Co-Chairs: Cécile Aenishaenslin, Université de Montréal Susan Kutz, University of Calgary Marieke Van der Velden, Veterinary Without Borders – Canada

    13:30 - 14:45 EST
    200C

    KNT12-Communicating Arctic science through storytelling

    With a constant stream of information hitting our inboxes and social media feeds, how do you effectively share your research results with the public? As researchers, you have access to some of the most remote areas of the planet and the most recent data from a rapidly changing environment. The importance for such data to be shared and the public's appetite for news and imagery from these regions is at an all-time high. This session will examine the most effective ways to communicate your research through storytelling, how to contribute stories to online platforms and pitch them to larger publications, as well as examples of success stories. Presenters will include journalists experienced in data journalism, Indigenous storytellers, and academics/programs who have had success in communicating their research or objectives. Co-Chairs: Kaitlyn Van De Woestyne, Arctic Research Foundation Tom Henheffer, Arctic Research Foundation

    13:30 - 14:45 EST
    206C

    MAR06-Environmental Change in the James Bay Region

    James Bay and adjacent coastal zones are home to many Indigenous nations and unique terrestrial, wetland and marine ecosystems. These ecosystems support critical habitat for many species, and are essential staging grounds for extraordinary numbers of migratory birds. Further, these lands hold globally significant carbon stocks. This region is undergoing rapid changes as sea ice declines and permafrost thaws. These changes, coupled with the effects of economic development in the region, may bring new challenges to those who live there, and will also drive feedbacks to the global carbon budget. Understanding these impacts and planning for a sustainable future require bridging Indigenous and scientific knowledge systems, as well as analyses across the land-sea continuum. The purpose of this session is to bring together researchers of all types, across disciplines and spanning both terrestrial and marine realms, to share knowledge of the James Bay region, the status of its ecosystems and environmental change. Co-Chairs: Sarah Finkelstein, University of Toronto Vern Cheechoo, Mushkegowuk Council Nicole Balliston, University of Waterloo Florin Pendea, Lakehead University Zou Zou Kuzyk, University of Manitoba

    13:30 - 14:45 EST
    206A

    MAR45-Arctic marine mammal research and monitoring

    The Arctic is rapidly transforming with implications for marine mammal populations significant to Indigenous peoples, including Inuit across Inuit Nunaat. Increasingly, collaborations are emerging between Arctic communities, organizations, and researchers that facilitate collective learning and produce new knowledge crucial to wildlife co-management, monitoring, and marine spatial planning. Evolving approaches, technologies and the contributions of diverse perspectives, including Indigenous ways of knowing, are advancing our understanding of marine mammal biology and ecology and enabling a more holistic view of the marine environment. Furthermore, reflecting on the design and application of these projects and programs provides insight into effective cross-boundary collaboration. In this session we welcome presentations from any discipline exploring novel methods, approaches, and findings related to the study of Arctic marine mammals and are particularly interested in highlighting community-involved projects. Co-Chairs: Kimberly Ovitz, University of Manitoba Enooyaq Sudlovenick, University of Manitoba Luke Storrie, University of Manitoba Emma Sutherland, University of Manitoba

    13:30 - 14:45 EST
    206D

    OTH35-The Role of Standards in Effective Data and Information Sharing and Use

    Knowledge systems, research methods and tools, and place-based perspectives in the North are diverse, making data sharing and use challenging. Standards are a well established tool to facilitate sharing and use. These standards include social norms, best practices, de facto (informal), and de jure (formal) standards. Standards exist within complex social-political environments and must be appropriate to those contexts and the rights holders and stakeholders involved. If context and appropriate engagement are not considered, informed and complete sharing and use is unlikely to succeed. Effective data standards must account for the full range of considerations about data collection, management, and use. We invite contributions and perspectives on data and information standards including examples of standardization processes that have succeeded, those that have failed to produce expected results, ideas on requirements or ways to improve the process, and critical perspectives on risks or unseen implications. Co-Chairs: Misha Warbanski, Polar Knowledge Canada Donald McLennan, Arctic Research Foundation Jackie Jacobson, Government of Northwest Territories Peter Pulsifer, Carleton University/Canadian Consortium for Arctic Data Internaoerability Simon Riopel, Natural Resources Canada

    13:30 - 14:45 EST
    200B

    OTH54-Advancing our Knowledge for Action: Northern Canada Regional Perspectives

    Over three years, Yukon University has worked collaboratively with northern partners and knowledge holders to prepare a "Northern Canada" chapter for the Regional Perspectives Report, which is part of Canada's National Assessment Process, Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action. In this panel, the key messages from this chapter will be presented and discussed. We will expand on the following themes: - Climate change is severely impacting northern landscapes and ecosystems. - Health impacts are intensifying and amplifying inequities in the North. - Safe travel in the North is threatened by climate change. - Northerners are leaders and innovators in climate change adaptation. - Recognizing inherent capacity is key to building climate resilience. We will explore knowledge gaps, emerging issues, and the ways that Indigenous and Western knowledge systems are contributing to climate change resilient decisions all across the North. Co-Chairs: Fiona Warren, Natural Resources CanadaBrian Horton, Yukon University Panelists: Bronwyn Hancock, Yukon University Fanny Amyot, Yukon University Ashlee Cunsolo, Labrador Campus of Memorial University Jackie Dawson, University of Ottawa Samantha Darling, Carleton University Pitseolak Pfiefer, Inuit Solutions

    13:30 - 16:00 EST
    201C

    SIKU Training for Indigenous-led Community Climate Action Projects (SM) (Open)

    In this workshop, participants will learn about the funding and support available through SIKU for communities to start local Climate Action Projects. SIKU: the Indigenous Knowledge Social Network is a web and mobile platform that provides tools and services for Indigenous communities to lead their own research and monitoring programs while retaining full data ownership and controlling access and privacy. Providing a GPS, map layers and easy ways to document observations on the land offline, as well as tools for project management, SIKU helps empower communities with the data that has always been a part of Indigenous Knowledge systems.

    13:30 - 14:45 EST
    200A

    TER31-Dynamic and mass balance evolution of Northern Hemisphere Glaciers

    Over the past several decades glaciers within the northern hemisphere have been responding to warming air temperatures. This has resulted in evolving mass balance, thermal regime and dynamic conditions within the region. Quantifying and characterizing these changes is of paramount importance for understanding and projecting future glacier change within the Arctic, which will have cascading impacts to downstream terrestrial and marine environments. In this session, we seek presentations that report ongoing glacier changes and their implications within the Arctic using a variety of methods, including field observations, modeling and/or remote sensing techniques. Co-Chairs: Abigail Dalton, University of Ottawa Natalija Nikolić, University of Waterloo Danielle Hallé, University of Waterloo

    13:30 - 14:45 EST
    206B

    TER56-Arctic Wildlife Ecology

    The Arctic is changing rapidly in a warming climate affecting wildlife in multiple ways. Documenting, understanding, and forecasting how animals can cope with such changes is crucial to eventually adopt conservation and mitigation measures. It is essential to document changes in animal physiology, movements, phenology, demography, etc. since they represent potential coping mechanisms. At a larger scale, current terrestrial food web structures and dynamics under extreme cold temperatures in winter and short summers and its relationships with other biomes (Arctic Ocean or more temperate wintering areas) are key to understand the cascading impacts of climate and anthropogenic disturbances at the community level. As those conditions may be forever changed, at least for hundreds or thousands of years, the knowledge gathered now and discussions occurring during this session will help predict the future of Arctic wildlife and how those changes will affect the relationships between Northerners and the land. Co-Chairs: Dominique Fauteux, Canadian Museum of Nature Pierre Legagneux, Université Laval

    15:30

    Canada/Eastern

    8 parallel sessions
    15:30 - 16:45 EST
    201A

    IHE24 - What Future for Dogs in Northern Communities?

    Dogs bring invaluable benefits for human well-being in all Northern communities, but at the same time, their mere presence bring up several challenges. In parallel, communities are developing, their human population is growing and so is their dog population both in size and diversity. What is the future of dogs in these communities? This is the central question of this round table that will give the floor to six representatives of communities, animal care or welfare organizations, and mushers. Panelists will discuss their vision for the future of dogs in Northern communities. How will these visions resemble the reality currently experienced in non-Northern communities? Or will we discover innovative futures that respect the traditions, practices and context specific to these communities? Considering the omnipresence of dogs in the North, this discussion should be a source of inspiration for all Northern communities. Co-Chairs: André Ravel, Université de Montréal Johanne Saint-Charles, Université du Québec à Montréal Panelists: Ross Miniquaken, animal control officer, Cree Nation of WemindjiCatherine Dickson, Public Health Department of the James Bay Cree Territory George Kauki (ex musher), lsuarsivik, Northern village of KuujjuaqLori Mercer, previously dog control officer, Cree Nation of WemindjiValli Fraser-Celin, previously with Winnipeg Humane Society now at University of Guelph, Ontario

    15:30 - 16:45 EST
    206C

    MAR06-Environmental Change in the James Bay Region

    James Bay and adjacent coastal zones are home to many Indigenous nations and unique terrestrial, wetland and marine ecosystems. These ecosystems support critical habitat for many species, and are essential staging grounds for extraordinary numbers of migratory birds. Further, these lands hold globally significant carbon stocks. This region is undergoing rapid changes as sea ice declines and permafrost thaws. These changes, coupled with the effects of economic development in the region, may bring new challenges to those who live there, and will also drive feedbacks to the global carbon budget. Understanding these impacts and planning for a sustainable future require bridging Indigenous and scientific knowledge systems, as well as analyses across the land-sea continuum. The purpose of this session is to bring together researchers of all types, across disciplines and spanning both terrestrial and marine realms, to share knowledge of the James Bay region, the status of its ecosystems and environmental change. Co-Chairs: Sarah Finkelstein, University of Toronto Vern Cheechoo, Mushkegowuk Council Nicole Balliston, University of Waterloo Florin Pendea, Lakehead University Zou Zou Kuzyk, University of Manitoba

    15:30 - 16:45 EST
    206A

    MAR45-Arctic marine mammal research and monitoring

    The Arctic is rapidly transforming with implications for marine mammal populations significant to Indigenous peoples, including Inuit across Inuit Nunaat. Increasingly, collaborations are emerging between Arctic communities, organizations, and researchers that facilitate collective learning and produce new knowledge crucial to wildlife co-management, monitoring, and marine spatial planning. Evolving approaches, technologies and the contributions of diverse perspectives, including Indigenous ways of knowing, are advancing our understanding of marine mammal biology and ecology and enabling a more holistic view of the marine environment. Furthermore, reflecting on the design and application of these projects and programs provides insight into effective cross-boundary collaboration. In this session we welcome presentations from any discipline exploring novel methods, approaches, and findings related to the study of Arctic marine mammals and are particularly interested in highlighting community-involved projects. Co-Chairs: Kimberly Ovitz, University of Manitoba Enooyaq Sudlovenick, University of Manitoba Luke Storrie, University of Manitoba Emma Sutherland, University of Manitoba

    15:30 - 16:45 EST
    200B

    NPD15 - Making research work for Nunavummiut

    A recent analysis of the Nunavut Research Licensing Database revealed that: i) community leadership in Nunavut research is not well understood; ii) community organizations experience a high burden of research licensing review; and, iii) research results are often inaccessible to community and territorial decision-makers. These results highlight a critical need to engage in a broad consultation to understand a range of experiences with the research process in Nunavut. This Townhall is an opportunity to ask questions, share experiences, and explore ideas with representatives of the Nunavut Research Institute, Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre, Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, the Aqqiumavvik Society, McMaster University, and Carleton University. This interactive discussion will help to inform a Nunavut-specific approach to implementing the National Inuit Strategy on Research with the goal of improving research engagement, relevance, capacity, and outcomes for Nunavummiut. Co-Chairs: Gita Ljubicic, McMaster University Jamal Shirley, Nunavut Research Institute Gwen Healey Akearok, Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre Town Hall Session

    15:30 - 16:45 EST
    206D

    OTH35-The Role of Standards in Effective Data and Information Sharing and Use

    Knowledge systems, research methods and tools, and place-based perspectives in the North are diverse, making data sharing and use challenging. Standards are a well established tool to facilitate sharing and use. These standards include social norms, best practices, de facto (informal), and de jure (formal) standards. Standards exist within complex social-political environments and must be appropriate to those contexts and the rights holders and stakeholders involved. If context and appropriate engagement are not considered, informed and complete sharing and use is unlikely to succeed. Effective data standards must account for the full range of considerations about data collection, management, and use. We invite contributions and perspectives on data and information standards including examples of standardization processes that have succeeded, those that have failed to produce expected results, ideas on requirements or ways to improve the process, and critical perspectives on risks or unseen implications. Co-Chairs: Misha Warbanski, Polar Knowledge Canada Donald McLennan, Arctic Research Foundation Jackie Jacobson, Government of Northwest Territories Peter Pulsifer, Carleton University/Canadian Consortium for Arctic Data Internaoerability Simon Riopel, Natural Resources Canada

    15:30 - 16:45 EST
    200C

    OTH47-Long-term trends of contaminants and the factors influencing them...

    Contaminant levels have been measured in the environment, wildlife and people in the North since the 1970s, and through Canada's Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) since the early 1990s. Long-term datasets such as these track changes in levels of contaminants over time, and help to understand any current and future risks they may pose. Temporal trends are also key to effectiveness evaluations of international agreements to control levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) under the Stockholm Convention and mercury under the Minamata Convention. Contaminant levels and trends may be impacted by changes in a wide-range of complex factors including those related to climate change (e.g., permafrost, sea-ice levels), wildlife ecology (e.g., structure of food webs) and other health issues (e.g., disease, zoonoses). This session welcomes submissions discussing long-term trends of contaminants and/or trends of factors that influence contaminant levels in Northern wildlife, the environment and Indigenous Peoples. Co-Chairs: Adam Morris, Northern Contaminants Program, CIRNAC Mary Gamberg, Gamberg Consulting

    15:30 - 16:45 EST
    200A

    TER31-Dynamic and mass balance evolution of Northern Hemisphere Glaciers

    Over the past several decades glaciers within the northern hemisphere have been responding to warming air temperatures. This has resulted in evolving mass balance, thermal regime and dynamic conditions within the region. Quantifying and characterizing these changes is of paramount importance for understanding and projecting future glacier change within the Arctic, which will have cascading impacts to downstream terrestrial and marine environments. In this session, we seek presentations that report ongoing glacier changes and their implications within the Arctic using a variety of methods, including field observations, modeling and/or remote sensing techniques. Co-Chairs: Abigail Dalton, University of Ottawa Natalija Nikolić, University of Waterloo Danielle Hallé, University of Waterloo

    15:30 - 16:45 EST
    206B

    TER56-Arctic Wildlife Ecology

    The Arctic is changing rapidly in a warming climate affecting wildlife in multiple ways. Documenting, understanding, and forecasting how animals can cope with such changes is crucial to eventually adopt conservation and mitigation measures. It is essential to document changes in animal physiology, movements, phenology, demography, etc. since they represent potential coping mechanisms. At a larger scale, current terrestrial food web structures and dynamics under extreme cold temperatures in winter and short summers and its relationships with other biomes (Arctic Ocean or more temperate wintering areas) are key to understand the cascading impacts of climate and anthropogenic disturbances at the community level. As those conditions may be forever changed, at least for hundreds or thousands of years, the knowledge gathered now and discussions occurring during this session will help predict the future of Arctic wildlife and how those changes will affect the relationships between Northerners and the land. Co-Chairs: Dominique Fauteux, Canadian Museum of Nature Pierre Legagneux, Université Laval

    17:00

    Canada/Eastern

    17:00 - 19:00 EST
    Ballroom A

    Poster Session

    19:00

    Canada/Eastern

    19:00 - 19:45 EST
    200B

    Marralik Documentary Screening

    Since 2016, the community of Kangiqsualujjuaq in Nunavik, and a team of university researchers have been building a community-based environmental monitoring program called Imalirijiit (Those who study water), at the center of which are science and culture camps called Nunami Sukuijainiq (Our science on the land), which represent a place for co-construction of knowledge, and sharing between local and scientific knowledge. In August 2021, the first marine camp was held in Marralik, on Ungava Bay, in collaboration with RNUK, the regional Nunavik Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Organization.

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